The Sacrifice that Cancels Guilt

forgivethemwHeavenly Father,

It is only through your mercy that the dark days of this particular Friday can be called good. When I consider myself justified, entitled, and excused from forgiving others, bring Jesus to my mind and His willingness to be stricken, smitten, and afflicted in my stead.

In Jesus’ Name,

Amen

“Stricken, Smitten, and Afflicted”
by Thomas Kelly, 1769-1854

Stricken, smitten, and afflicted,
See Him dying on the tree!
‘Tis the Christ by man rejected;
Yes, my soul, ’tis He! ’tis He!
‘Tis the long-expected Prophet,
David’s Son, yet David’s Lord;
Proofs I see sufficient of it:
‘Tis the true and faithful Word.

Tell me, ye who hear Him groaning,
Was there ever grief like His?
Friends through fear His cause disowning,
Foes insulting His distress;
Many hands were raised to wound Him,
None would interpose to save;
But the deepest stroke that pierced Him
Was the stroke that Justice gave.

Ye who think of sin but lightly
Nor suppose the evil great
Here may view its nature rightly,
Here its guilt may estimate.
Mark the Sacrifice appointed,
See who bears the awful load;
‘Tis the WORD, the LORD’S ANOINTED,
Son of Man and Son of God.

Here we have a firm foundation;
Here the refuge of the lost;
Christ’s the Rock of our salvation,
His the name of which we boast.
Lamb of God, for sinners wounded,
Sacrifice to cancel guilt!
None shall ever be confounded
Who on Him their hope have built.

The Lutheran Hymnal
Hymn #153
Text: Is. 53:3-5
Author: Thomas Kelly, 1804
Tune: “O mein Jesu, ich muss sterben”
1st Published in:_Geistliche VolksliederTown: Paderborn, 1850

It is finishedw

PrayerPoints ~ March 10th, Thursday

week 5-W

Today’s PrayerPoint ~ Psalm 95

“Let us come before him with thanksgiving and extol him with music and song.”        Psalm 95:2

It is so important for me to start my day being thankful for what God has done for me. It helps my perspective and my focus and it helps me to be more loving to others, even on those days when I don’t get enough sleep. Whenever I read Psalm 95, I hear the song posted below in my mind, but it is also a part of the liturgy in LCMS (Lutheran Church ~ Missouri Synod) congregations so I am happy to have two reference points for it!

I know I have mentioned the power of music and Scripture memory before. If you are a part of a congregation that uses liturgy, you know that after sitting in church week after week and year after year that there is so much Scripture tucked away in your brain. You can be really young, and a non-reader to learn it and you can be challenged with vision issues and still participate. Music filled with Scripture can bridge ages and abilities and can be such a blessing to a congregation.

So, a little bit about this Psalm 95 posted below: John Michael Talbot is Catholic and I was introduced to him when I was about 13 (now I am 50, so this was quite a while ago). For me, this is an awesome “morning song” — a great way to get my mind headed in the right direction!

During Lent, the use of alleluia is often restricted in some church bodies. In the LCMS  there are some other practices Check out the article Keeping a Holy Lent ~ a post from the LCMS with some great explanations.

Trigger Warning: This song does have Alleluia in it. So if that is going to bug you, don’t listen until after Easter.

PrayerPoints ~ February 22

Today is Ash Wednesday.

Whether or not you observe Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent is a great time for repentance and spiritual renewal. Here is a link to a Lutheran church in Kentucky with a great explanation: http://bit.ly/ash_wed
It is so easy to get caught up in the demands of life and skip past honest reflection and confession of my sin as well as delay or completely forget to seek God’s forgiveness and reconciliation. Join me as I journey through Lent again with considerations for prayer. The older I get, the faster all time seems to fly and this season in the church year is an opportunity to stop and savor God’s timeless provisions.
Heavenly Father,
It is so easy to let the tasks of living life edge out my time with you. Allow these next several weeks of Lent be an opportunity for reflection on Your Holy Word, a reordering of Your place in my life, and the recognition of my desperate need for You. You know my sins so well. When I pause long enough to ponder my sin, the weight is unbearable. Please help me keep that measure of recognition of the ugliness of sin as close to me as the joy of Your salvation. The beauty of You is in such contrast to the darkness of sin. May Your love and light flood my dark places and heal my sin and brokenness.
In Jesus’ Name, Amen.

PrayerPoints are written from the heart and inspired during quiet moments with God — usually around 5am. First and foremost, I believe these are nudges from God that apply directly to me. A typical PrayerPoint is typed up within the hour of being convicted about a certain area needing prayer. You may wonder why PrayerPoints are very focused during Lent and very sporadic during the rest of the year. There are several reasons for that ~ I am often distracted and disobedient but I also pray I am discerning. Not everything God is teaching me is meant to be shared immediately. Please excuse grammatical inconsistencies!      Liz Vos